Federal Small Business Subcontracting Program

The Federal Small Business Subcontracting Program authorized by Public Law 95 - 507, aims to ensure
domestic small businesses receive maximal, attainable opportunities to compete and receive subcontracts resulting from Federal prime contracts exceeding $700,000 for products and services (FAR 19.702) and more than $1.5 million for construction of a public facility.


Vendors who are eligible to do business with Emory under the Federal Small Business Subcontracting Program for potential subcontracting opportunities are required to be registered in the System for Award Management (SAM) and required to obtain a Dun & Bradstreet Number (D-U-N-S). To be eligible, small business classifications include:


Small Business (SB)

The Small Businesss Administration (SBA), for most industries, defines a "small business" either in terms of the average number of employees over the past 12 months, or average annual receipts over the past three years. Learn more about qualifying as a small business with SBA, Here.

Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB)

a firm that must be 51% or more owned and control by one or more disadvantaged persons. The disadvantaged person or persons must be socially disadvantaged and economically disadvantaged. The firm must be small, according to SBA's size standards. Learn more.

Women - owned Small Business (WOSB)

a small business concern that is at least 51% directly and unconditionally owned and controlled by one or more women who are citizens (born or naturalized) of the United States. For additional details.

Economically Disadvantaged Women - owned Small Business (EDWOSB)

a small business concern that is at least 51 percent directly and unconditionally owned and controlled by one or more women who are citizens (born or naturalized) of the United States and who are economically disadvantaged. The EDWOSB automatically qualifies as a women-owned small business eligible for the WOSB Program.

A woman is presumed economically disadvantaged if she has a personal net worth of less than $750,000, her adjusted gross yearly income averaged over the three years preceding the certification does not exceed $350,000, and the fair market value of all her assets (including her primary residence and the value of the business concern) does not exceed $6 million. Learn more.

Veteran - owned Small Business (VOSB)

is a small business concern that is not less than 51 percent owned by one or more veterans (as defined at 38 U.S.C.101(2)), or in the case of any publicly owned business, not less than 51 percent of the stock of which is owned by one or more veterans. The management and daily business operations of which are controlled by one or more veterans and qualifies as small for Federal business size standard purposes. More Details.

Service - Disabled Veteran - owned Small Business (VOSB)

a service-disabled veteran-owned small business concern that must be at least 51% owned by one or more service-disabled veterans or, in the case of any publicly owned business, at least 51% of the stock of which is owned by one or more Service-Disabled Veterans. The service-disabled veteran must have a service-connected disability that has been determined by the Department of Veterans Affairs or Department of Defense.

Note: The Small Business Act defines the term "service-disabled veteran" as one with a disability that is service-connected, as defined by Title 38 U.S.C., section 101. The term "service-connected disability" is a disability that was incurred or aggravated in the line of duty in the active military, naval, or air service. For additional details.

Historically Underutilized Business Zone (HUBZone)

a business concern that is considered small by SBA standards. It is owned and controlled at least 51% by U.S. citizens, a Community Development Corporation (CDC), an agricultural cooperative or an Indian tribe; at least 35% of its employees reside in a HUBZone. Employees must live in a primary residence within that area for at least 180 days or be a currently registered voter in that area. More information.

Process for Producing the Individual Small Business Subcontracting Plan



1. OSP notifies the Procurement Small Business Administrator - The Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP) notifies the Procurement Small Business (SB) Administrator of a Federal contract request from a Principal Investigator (PI) that exceeds $700,000 for goods and services and more than $1.5 million for construction of a public facility.

2. OSP schedules a meeting with the PI x SB Administrator - The Office of Sponsored Programs schedules a meeting with Principal Investigator (PI) and Procurement Small Business Administrator to develop a Small Business Subcontracting Plan.

3. PI submits a budget to OSP x SB Administrator - Upon the conclusion of the initial meeting, the PI submits a budget to OSP and the Small Business Administrator. The budget should include: direct cost of materials, supplies, travel, other direct costs, consultants, and subcontractors.

4. SB Administrator sends the PI a RFQ form to complete - A request for quotation (RFQ) form is sent to the Principal Investigator (PI) and his or her team to complete. The form should list all products (materials, supplies, and equipment) and/or services that may be subcontracted for at least one year of the life of the contract. Once the form is submitted, the Procurement Sourcing Manager will submit the RFQ to small businesses. Please Note: The RFQ process takes a minimum of five weeks.

5. Small Business Goals are established - Upon receipt of the request for quotation responses, the small business goals are determined based on the subcontracting dollar amount. The total estimated dollar value of all planned subcontracting is developed according to the supplies and services that will be required for the contract. OSP x the SB Administrator assess the RFQ responses according to subcontracting allotted dollars.

6. The SBSP is reviewed, signed, and submitted to the federal agency - Once the small business goal categories are determined, the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP) and the Small Business Administrator review and assess the Small Business Subcontracting Plan (SBSP) for accuracy. If the plan is approved, the Small Business Administrator signes the plan. OSP submits the SBSP to the federal agency for consideration.


Each federal agency has an annual goal for small business participation in its contracts.

Notification of Award


The Office of Sponsored Programs and/or the Principal Investigator's coordinator notifies the Small Business Administrator within 24 hours upon receipt of an award. Once the Small Business Administrator is notified, a meeting will be scheduled with the Principal Investigator and his or her team to discuss the subcontracting award reporting requirements.


Monitor: Reporting Requirements


Reporting Period (ISR Only) Individual Subcontract Report (ISR) Due Submission to Electronic
Subcontracting Reporting System (eSRS)
1st Quarter
(Oct. 1 - Dec. 31)
January 15 No submission for this period.
2nd Quarter
(Jan. 1 - Mar. 31)
April 15 Due before April 30
3rd Quarter
(Apr. 1 - June 30)
July 15 No submission for this period.
4th Quarter
(July 1 - Sept. 30)
October 15 Due before October 30


Note: If there was not any small business spend during one of the specified reporting periods above, a justification letter should be sent to the Small Business Administrator either on or before the report deadline. State the reason for $0.00 spend.



Training: Small Business Resources for the PI

bizpro


Forms and Other Small Business Resources


  Forms:

Federal Small Business Subcontracting Plan Request for Quotation Form
Federal Small Business Subcontracting Plan Worksheet
Federal Small Business Subcontracting Plan Coversheet

  Other Small Business Resources:

Introduction to the Small Business Administration (SBA)
Government Contracting for Small Businesses
Find my North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code